Genealogy – Kilmington Primary http://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/ Tue, 26 Oct 2021 23:02:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/default.png Genealogy – Kilmington Primary http://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/ 32 32 Genealogy Society finds tombstones buried at Windsor Grove cemetery https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/genealogy-society-finds-tombstones-buried-at-windsor-grove-cemetery/ Tue, 26 Oct 2021 22:14:54 +0000 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/genealogy-society-finds-tombstones-buried-at-windsor-grove-cemetery/ Breadcrumb Links Local News Author of the article: Taylor Campbell Release date : October 26, 2021 • 50 minutes ago • 4 minutes to read • Join the conversation CJ Scott (left), Rosemary Lunau, Marty LeBlanc and Pat Clancy (right), all members of the Essex County branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society, clean up an […]]]>

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What’s in a name? For a local group of ancestry devotees willing to get dirty to uncover family histories, the names unveil the stories of Windsor.

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Over the past four or five decades, the Essex County branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society has made it their mission to document and digitize names and dates on gravestones across Windsor-Essex. In recent years, however, they have uncovered tombstones buried at Windsor Grove Cemetery – one of the city’s oldest cemeteries – which prompted the addition of shovels and shovels to their quest for knowledge.

It’s interesting, the things we find

Pulling a kid’s cart filled with buckets, scrub brushes, monument-safe soaps, and a small pressurized water sprayer, a handful of members walk cautiously between the graves, each looking at the stones and ground around them looking for clues that could lead to hidden information. They are looking for large grassy patches devoid of gravestones where squat gravestones have likely sunk into the ground and have been buried. They also look for monuments that appear to lack tall pillars, which may have fallen and been allowed to slowly descend underground.

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When they find a promising spot, they use a thin, pointed pole with a handle to stab the grass until they hit something hard. Then the digging begins.

Ray Morneau (left) and his nephew Ray Morneau of Hallmark Memorial Co. lift a buried monument pillar from the ground at Windsor Grove Cemetery on Tuesday, October 26, 2021. The pillar was found by members of the Essex County branch from the Ontario Genealogical Society.  .
Ray Morneau (left) and his nephew Ray Morneau of Hallmark Memorial Co. lift a buried monument pillar from the ground at Windsor Grove Cemetery on Tuesday, October 26, 2021. The pillar was found by members of the Essex County branch from the Ontario Genealogical Society. . Photo by Taylor Campbell /Windsor Star

“We’re trying to save what we can of family history,” Genealogical Society member David Hutchinson told The Star.

Some of the cemetery files were lost in a fire a long time ago, he said. None of the hidden graves his group found while pushing the ground were listed until they came to dig them up.

“For us, it’s pretty fun. But as we go through one, we get the names and information so that we can add them to the databases. “

Earlier this week, the group unearthed two pillars that had fallen from large monuments installed in 1869, three years after Windsor Grove Cemetery was established. The monuments were for John Furzer Elliot and Josiah Strong, two “eminent and wealthy” men in Canada in the mid-19th century, according to documents from the Essex Historical Society. The monuments also listed the names of a few members of each family.

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When the rain-soaked ground dries out, representatives from Hallmark Memorial Co., a monument company in Oldcastle, will use heavy machinery to lift the pillars and put them back in place.

A buried headstone unearthed and cleaned by the Essex County branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society at Windsor Grove Cemetery is seen with the group's cart full of cleaning supplies on Tuesday, October 26, 2021.
A buried headstone unearthed and cleaned by the Essex County branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society at Windsor Grove Cemetery is seen with the group’s cart full of cleaning supplies on Tuesday, October 26, 2021. Photo by Taylor Campbell /Windsor Star

When not digging in the cemetery, the genealogical society cleans up gravestones that are above ground but difficult to read. They use a mild soap intended for washing horses because dish soap can damage old stones. For tombstones covered with lichen, they use a special biodegradable cleaner called D / 2.

Every time they reveal a new name, they take a photo and write it down.

“These guys did a fantastic job,” said Ed Shabsove, managing director of the cemetery, who noted how successful the genealogical company was in cleaning up some previously unreadable headstones.

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About four or five years ago, Shabsove regularly received complaints about the condition of Windsor Grove Cemetery, which had crooked gravestones, poorly maintained trees and dilapidated infrastructure, and was in desperate need of attention. Thousands of people are buried there, including Windsor’s first mayor, Samuel Smith MacDonell, Gordon McGregor, who helped found Ford of Canada, union leader Charlie Brooks and dozens of First and Second veterans. World War, to name a few.

With Windsor Grove long at full capacity and with no source of income, Windsor Memorial Gardens, the non-profit organization that also looks after the 155-year-old cemetery, has supported its upkeep. Over the past three years or so, Shabsove said they have devoted a significant amount of resources to turning the cemetery into something of beauty. They straightened 300 to 500 monuments every year – labor-intensive work.

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“We try to make it fantastic,” Shabsove said. “The transformation we are achieving is showing, and honestly, we are getting a lot of compliments from people. “

The branch of the local genealogical society was “a big help” in making this change happen, he said. Over the next two years, Shabsove hopes to establish historical tours through the cemetery, highlighting the stories of those buried there.

“Almost everyone knows someone who is buried there. I’m so happy with where he went.

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Pat Clancy, a genealogical society advisor, said her group helps those looking for their own family tree.

“You know other people are doing the same elsewhere – it’s a great community,” she said. “It’s interesting, the things we find.”

To date, the Essex County branch of the Genealogical Society has transcribed information from about 20,000 headstones across the region. Since starting to search for buried headstones in Windsor Grove three years ago, they have found around five each week during the summer months and early fall.

“It’s never ending,” Clancy said.

tcampbell@postmedia.com

twitter.com/wstarcampbell

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Ardith Svitak | Death notice | norfolkdailynews.com https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/ardith-svitak-death-notice-norfolkdailynews-com/ Mon, 25 Oct 2021 16:27:00 +0000 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/ardith-svitak-death-notice-norfolkdailynews-com/ HOWELLS – The service for Ardith J. Svitak, 63, Howells, will be held at 10:30 am on Wednesday, October 27 at St. John’s Catholic Church in Howells. Reverend Stanley Schmit and Deacon Bill Schlautmann will officiate. Interment will be in St. Henry’s Cemetery in rural Howells. Visitations will be held Tuesday from 5 pm to […]]]>

HOWELLS – The service for Ardith J. Svitak, 63, Howells, will be held at 10:30 am on Wednesday, October 27 at St. John’s Catholic Church in Howells. Reverend Stanley Schmit and Deacon Bill Schlautmann will officiate. Interment will be in St. Henry’s Cemetery in rural Howells.

Visitations will be held Tuesday from 5 pm to 7 pm at St. John’s Catholic Church in Howells with a vigil at 7 pm.

Ardith Svitak passed away on Friday October 22, 2021 at her residence in Howells.

The Stonacek Funeral Chapel in Norfolk is in charge of the arrangements.

1958-2021

The service will be broadcast live on the Stonacek Funeral Chapel Facebook page.

Ardith was born on March 1, 1958 in Norfolk to Harry and LaVerne (Harms) Warneke. She attended elementary school at a rural county district school outside of Tilden and graduated from Randolph High School. She then attended Northeast Community College in Norfolk.

She married Douglas Svitak on May 10, 1980, at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Osmond. After their marriage, Ardith and Doug moved to Howells. Throughout her life she worked at the Norfolk YMCA, Stanton Newspaper, Gaskill Insurance in Norfolk, Howells Poultry and The Norfolk Shopper. She currently worked for At Your Service In Home Care located in Neligh and served at The Grain Bin in Howells.

Ardith has been active in the Stanton County 4-H Club and also as a leader in horticulture. In her spare time, she enjoyed sewing, quilting, camping, spending time with her grandchildren, and researching her family’s genealogy.

Survivors include her spouse, Douglas Svitak; one daughter, Stephanie (Ross) Cohn of Norfolk; son Steven (Miranda) Svitak of Leigh; grandchildren Lily Cohn, Madison Cohn, Nicholas Cohn, Jessica Cohn, Barrett Svitak, Dakota Svitak, Benelli Svitak, Riggins Svitak and Sienna Svitak; sisters Julene (Ron) Butterfield of Stanton, Brenda (Ken) Thomas of Stanton and Debbie Warneke of Stanton.

She was predeceased by her parents, Harry and LaVerne Warneke, and a brother, Roland Warneke.

The organist will be Wayne Molacek, and the St. John’s Choir and the St. Peter and Paul Choir will sing. The casket bearers will be Steven Svitak, Eugene Svitak, Jason Hassler, Jeremy Hassler, Kyle Vering and Lee Vering. The honorary bearers of the coffin will be Ardith’s grandchildren.

Instead of flowers, the family requests that memorials be made to the family for later designation.

Condolences can be expressed to the family online at www.stonacekfuneralchapel.com.

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Blacks find genealogy increasingly accessible | Local https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/blacks-find-genealogy-increasingly-accessible-local/ Sun, 24 Oct 2021 05:05:16 +0000 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/blacks-find-genealogy-increasingly-accessible-local/ Perhaps this is the best time for African Americans to research their family history. Today’s family researchers stand on the shoulders of giants, said Timothy Pinnick, an African-American genealogical research expert. He spoke on Saturday at a virtual conference hosted by the Allen County Public Library’s Genealogy Center. The session was titled “Using Researchers to […]]]>

Perhaps this is the best time for African Americans to research their family history.

Today’s family researchers stand on the shoulders of giants, said Timothy Pinnick, an African-American genealogical research expert.

He spoke on Saturday at a virtual conference hosted by the Allen County Public Library’s Genealogy Center. The session was titled “Using Researchers to Benefit from Your African-American Research”.

Unlike decades ago, Pinnick said, black history is a recognized discipline today, and more and more academics are contributing to research that amateur family detectives can use.

At the same time, he said, the research is more accessible because much of it is published online.

“Much of the heavy lifting has already been done by your learned ancestors,” Pinnick said. “It’s time for you to develop your (research) skills. “

Pinnick described several research strategies, such as using academic libraries, large public libraries, online sources and websites and members of professional genealogy associations.

Each of these resources can direct a researcher to bibliographies, scholarly journals, books, theses and dissertations, and journals owned by Blacks, which can convey a wealth of information.

He used as an example someone who had found ancestors in Georgia’s black belt listed as farmers in a late 19th-century census.

But the family first seemed to disappear, then to appear in the census of a northern town in 1920.

Looking through the agricultural stories of the South compiled by researchers, a researcher can find the entry of the cotton boll weevil in Georgia several years earlier and a cotton crop that has plunged in just half a dozen years.

That doesn’t prove the parents are gone because of poor harvests, Pinnick said. “But that comes close to the likelihood that the ancestor is gone due to the boll weevil infestation.”

About 70 people, who virtually attended the conference, were provided with many resources to help them continue their research.

Fort Wayne resident Carrie Tucker attended the conference with her sister Elizabeth Nelson of Detroit. Using a library computer, they said, they obtained good information to continue their search for the Nelson and Barnfield families.

Nelson was the name of their father’s parents and Barnfield was the name of their mother’s lineage, said Tucker, 74.

The driving force behind their research, Tucker said, was “to have a legacy” for their family, which includes 10 children – and now, many members of the following generations.

All 10 siblings have studied beyond high school, Tucker said, adding that the research has helped her see her parents’ lives in a different light.

“It made me realize,” she said, “how hard they’ve worked to get this far.”

rsalter@jg.net

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Genealogy: American Ancestors to Host “Basics of New England Research” Show | Life in the valley https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/genealogy-american-ancestors-to-host-basics-of-new-england-research-show-life-in-the-valley/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/genealogy-american-ancestors-to-host-basics-of-new-england-research-show-life-in-the-valley/ American Ancestors will host a free live broadcast from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, October 28. The title is “The Foundations of New England Research”, presented by Anne Lawthers. “Whether your ancestors lived in New England in the 17th or 21st century, this presentation will give you the basics to begin – and […]]]>

American Ancestors will host a free live broadcast from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, October 28. The title is “The Foundations of New England Research”, presented by Anne Lawthers.

“Whether your ancestors lived in New England in the 17th or 21st century, this presentation will give you the basics to begin – and advance – your research on the New England archives. In preparation for the release of the sixth edition of the Genealogist’s Handbook for New England Research, this presentation will give you the basic historical context, the general organization of the documents, the essential resources and unique strategies that will give you a good foundation for successful retrieval. your New England ancestors. New England includes the present-day states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

To register, go to shorturl.at/sPTVY and register.

III

A valuable online destination for useful information and training on your genealogy skills can be found in the Legacy Family Tree Library at https://familytreewebinars.com/webinar-library/.

Legacy Family Tree offers several live webinars per month on various genealogical topics. And once the live broadcast is over, the video is placed in their library for viewing anytime. Here you can watch these presentations for free at home and on your own schedule.

On the site, click Upcoming Webinars to see what’s happening live. The November and December program includes new presentations on topics such as ancestor research in London, investigative genetic genealogy for law enforcement, colonial Georgia during the Revolution, information research on slaves in the Master’s Church, court records for people of color, planning your research, how to build a genealogy website on WordPress, finding Scottish ancestors in Canada, using historical maps, things to do DNA don’ts, documenting families and communities lost during the Holocaust, browsing the National Archives website, using the National Archives of England website, and learning about immigrants through the cluster research.

Click on the webinar library and you will see all past webinars which can be viewed at any time. These can be sorted in different ways, for example by subject or general subject, by language (some are presented in languages ​​other than English) and by speaker. Good viewing.

To question

I’m trying to find a grave and other information on the death of Rhoda Elizabeth (Cain) Williams, who was married to John W. Williams in Owen County, Indiana. Finding a death or burial certificate for John Butler Williams, born and deceased in 1860 in Owen County, Indiana. Family rumor has it that he was buried with his mother Elizabeth Frances (Evans) Williams at Elsroth Cemetery in Owen County, Indiana. She had died in childbirth. Elizabeth Evans was also married to John W. Williams and they had another child named Emma Lucinda Williams. Emma married William Demis Stevens and they had several children. If you have any information about this family, contact Rebecca Bass at 10474 N. Murphy Road, Brazil, Indiana 47834, phone 812-446-0711, email rebeccabass@insightbb.com.

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A Native American genealogy center is planned for the First Americans Museum https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/a-native-american-genealogy-center-is-planned-for-the-first-americans-museum/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 10:00:51 +0000 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/a-native-american-genealogy-center-is-planned-for-the-first-americans-museum/ FAM opens to the public The First Americans Museum officially opened on Saturday, September 18. Oklahoman Dr. Charles Knife Chief recalls researching information about his Native American ancestors. The Tahlequah doctor said he hit a roadblock in his search because many Native Americans were displaced from their original lands and sent to what is now […]]]>

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Dr. Charles Knife Chief recalls researching information about his Native American ancestors.

The Tahlequah doctor said he hit a roadblock in his search because many Native Americans were displaced from their original lands and sent to what is now Oklahoma. Additionally, Knife Chief said much of Native American history is often passed down through oral history, and genealogical documentation is not always available.

Such obstacles could be overcome with the creation of a Native American genealogy center that would be housed in the new First Americans Museum in Oklahoma City.

James Pepper Henry, director and CEO of the museum, and members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, recently announced plans for the new center.

“History of food”: Indigenous chef makes First Americans Museum restaurant a place of learning

They said it would be created through a collaboration between the museum and the nonprofit FamilySearch of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which has what is considered to be the largest genealogical database in the world. world.

Michelle Magnusson, spokesperson for the Latter-Day Saints’ Oklahoma Communications Council, said that Utah-based FamilySearch offers an online software resource for individuals to search for historical records, create a personal family tree, and connect to a world tree. They can also store photographs, videos and other memorabilia in the archives.

She said FamilySearch provides an accessible way for people to start finding their ancestors at no cost to the user.

Pepper Henry and church leaders held a special Sunday rally at the museum to announce the collaboration. Church elder Kyle S. McKay also took the opportunity to tell those gathered that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is donating $ 2 million for the new center.

“Memorable occasion”: Members of Oklahoma’s 39 Tribes Celebrate OKC’s New First Americans Museum

Magnusson said it will be an interactive center where individuals can explore their family history and research their ancestors, regardless of their cultural heritage. She said it will be staffed with specially trained volunteers to support those seeking their Indigenous roots.

Tom Gray, regional president of the Oklahoma church, said his faith group donation will help fund the often expensive technology needed to run the genealogy center. He said the technology will come from FamilySearch.

Gray said there are over 40,000 Latter-day Saints in Oklahoma and many are “early Americans.”

“So we’re diverse and we’re a lot of different things but hopefully the main thing that we’ll be will be your friend,” Gray said.

Following: OKC’s First Americans Museum celebrates Indigenous Peoples Day

To answer questions

Pepper Henry said that even before the First Americans Museum opened, people asked him and other associates at the museum how they could determine if they had Native American ancestors or how to develop genealogical information. Native American women they already had.

He said the genealogy center, which will be housed in the museum’s visitor center, will help answer many of these questions.

Pepper Henry said it’s important to note that the center of the museum will interface with documents and records that FamilySearch has already accumulated. He also said the museum will exercise full surveillance over the genealogy center and there are no plans to try to obtain tribal records, which may cause concern for some tribes.

Pepper Henry said he visited FamilySearch headquarters in Utah and thought it would be a short time there.

“You can go down a rabbit hole quite easily there. We thought we would be there for 45 minutes. Six and a half hours later we were finally leaving,” he said.

The museum director, a member of the Kaw Nation, said he had learned something he didn’t know – that he also had ties to the Iowa tribe.

“I was amazed,” he said.

‘Unique experience’: First Americans Museum set to elevate Oklahoma City as a tourist destination

Meanwhile, Knife Chief, a member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma and bishop of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was among those who attended Sunday’s rally. He said the genealogy center would give a huge boost to the genealogical efforts of people looking for their Native American roots.

After hitting the initial roadblock, Knife Chief was finally able to find information about one of his ancestors who lived in Nebraska. He said he found what he was looking for through early US census work with the tribes.

But Knife Chief said not everyone will be so successful on their own and the center will be a great resource for them.

“I was fortunate that one of my ancestors, my great-grandfather, was a chef and the first knife chef in Indian territory. What time was and what time,” Knife Chief said.

“Sometimes things can get lost. Sometimes things can be beautified, so it’s good to have some documentation. This (genealogy center) will help people who are afraid that they can’t do anything or find what whether it be. “

Following: Leonardo DiCaprio visits new OKC museum as “Killers of the Flower Moon” ends in Oklahoma

Go past a “brick wall”

Knife Chief and other Latter-day Saint leaders at the recent gathering said church members believe God has ordained the family unit to be together for eternity, so genealogy is extremely important to them. .

With that in mind, the Latter-day Saints of Oklahoma, in collaboration with a national effort, launched a genealogy project with black genealogists and historians from across the state to help transcribe and digitize the Freedman’s data. Office in 2015.

The goal of the landmark project was to help black Americans connect with their ancestors and help them break through the so-called “brick wall of 1870”.

The phrase describes the barrier that many black Americans encountered when they could not trace their ancestry any further than the 1870 US Census – the first census to list free slaves with surnames.

The Latter-day Saint-led project opened up a treasure trove of ancestral records by helping to transcribe and digitize 1 million documents and records from the Freedmen’s Bureau, which was a government agency that aided slaves after the emancipation.

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Carson Carmichael obituary (1928 – 2021) – Garner, North Carolina https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/carson-carmichael-obituary-1928-2021-garner-north-carolina/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 01:36:26 +0000 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/carson-carmichael-obituary-1928-2021-garner-north-carolina/ Carson Carmichael, Jr. May 19, 1928 – October 16, 2021 Garner, NC – Carson Carmichael, Jr., 93, passed away peacefully at home on Saturday, October 16, 2021 after a long period of deteriorating health. Carson was born on May 19, 1928 in Mullins, South Carolina. He was the son of Carson Carmichael, Sr. and Myrtle […]]]>
Carson Carmichael, Jr.
May 19, 1928 – October 16, 2021
Garner, NC – Carson Carmichael, Jr., 93, passed away peacefully at home on Saturday, October 16, 2021 after a long period of deteriorating health.
Carson was born on May 19, 1928 in Mullins, South Carolina. He was the son of Carson Carmichael, Sr. and Myrtle Weatherly Carmichael of Fork, South Carolina. He graduated from Lake View High School in 1945 and entered Clemson University that summer. Carson graduated from Clemson in 1948 with a bachelor’s degree in agricultural engineering.
After graduation, Carson was employed by Appalachian Electric Power Company as an Industrial Power Sales Engineer in Southwest Virginia. In 1949, he met Rosemary Clarkston of Seminary, Virginia, who was a high school teacher in Clintwood, Virginia. The couple married on June 2, 1951 and were fortunate enough to have a 70-year marriage. While living in Abingdon, Virginia, they welcomed the birth of their only child, Carson Carmichael, III, on September 29, 1954.
From 1955 to 1957, Carson was on active duty in the US Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, where he served as a project officer at the Wright Air Development Center. After active service, he served in the Air Force Reserves, retiring with the rank of major in 1973.
From 1957 until his retirement in 1991, Carson was employed by Carolina Power and Light Company (now Duke Energy Progress) in Raleigh, North Carolina. During his career at CP&L, he held positions in sales, engineering and management, including director of industrial sales, director of energy services and director of joint projects.
Carson was a professional engineer registered in North Carolina and South Carolina. He was President and Life Member of the Raleigh Engineers Club and Life Member of the Professional Engineers of North Carolina. He has chaired committees of the Edison Electric Institute and the Southeastern Electric Exchange and has served on the committee of the Electric Power Research Institute. Carson was also a member of the American Arbitration Association.
Carson was a founding member of the Garner Jaycees, Garner Golden K Kiwanis Club (president for three terms), Garner Country Club and Raleigh Capital City Club. He was also a member of the President’s Club of the Clemson University Foundation. During his retirement, Carson delivered Meals on Wheels for 19 years.
Carson was a dedicated member of the First Presbyterian Church of Garner for 63 years. He served the church as a Sunday School teacher, deacon, elder, session clerk, and administrator.
After his retirement, Carson and Rosemary traveled extensively in the United States and Europe, as well as a trip to Siberia. Carson had a deep love for family, history and genealogy. He tirelessly researched his ancestors, which culminated in the publication in 2003 of his book Some Carmichael and Weatherly Roots and Branches.
In addition to his parents, Carson was predeceased by his brother, Charles Francis Carmichael, and his sister, Dorita Carmichael Oliver.
He is survived by his wife, Rosemary Clarkston Carmichael; son, Carson Carmichael, III and wife, Deborah Murray Carmichael of Raleigh; grandson Neil McCall Carmichael (Tara) of Wilmington; grandson Davis Alexander Carmichael of Brevard; great-grandchildren Julia Katherine Carmichael and Carson John Carmichael of Wilmington; brother, John Daniel Carmichael and sister-in-law, Patricia Coleman Carmichael of Latta, South Carolina, and ten nieces and nephews.
The family will receive friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, October 22, 2021 at Bryan-Lee Funeral Home, 1200 Benson Road, Garner, NC 27529. A funeral service will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, October 23, 2021 at First Presbyterian Church of Garner, 503 Lakeside Drive, Garner, NC 27529. Interment will follow immediately at Montlawn Memorial Park, 2911 South Wilmington Street, Raleigh, NC 27603.
In lieu of flowers, commemorations can be made to the First Presbyterian Church of Garner Endowment Fund at the above address or to a charity of its choice.

Posted by The State on October 21, 2021.

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Genealogy tips, tricks and treats at the Davenport Public Library https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/genealogy-tips-tricks-and-treats-at-the-davenport-public-library/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 18:41:59 +0000 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/genealogy-tips-tricks-and-treats-at-the-davenport-public-library/ Join us for an afternoon of genealogy at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center on Sunday 24 Octobere 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.. Meet other genealogists, learn tips and tricks, and taste delicious treats! We’ll learn how to access the Ancestry library from home, available until the end of the year! This program will take place […]]]>

Join us for an afternoon of genealogy at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center on Sunday 24 Octobere 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.. Meet other genealogists, learn tips and tricks, and taste delicious treats! We’ll learn how to access the Ancestry library from home, available until the end of the year!

This program will take place in person at Main Street Library (321 Main Street) and virtually.

If you prefer to attend in person, please register here: https://davenportlibrary.libcal.com/event/8321412.

If you prefer to participate virtually, please register here: https://davenportlibrary.libcal.com/event/8322424. Virtual registrants will receive an email with meeting details.

This event is generously supported by the Scott County Iowa Genealogical Society.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.davenportlibrary.com or call the library at (563) 326-7832.

Genealogy tips, tricks and treats at the Davenport Public Library

Sean Leary is an author, director, artist, musician, producer and entrepreneur who has written professionally since his debut at the age of 11 in the pages of the Comics Buyers Guide. A graduate with honors from the University of Southern California’s master’s program, he has written more than 50 books, including best-selling books The Arimathean, Every Number is Lucky to Someone, and We Are All Characters.

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Phenotyping: Can Your DNA Tell The Police What You Look Like? https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/phenotyping-can-your-dna-tell-the-police-what-you-look-like/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/phenotyping-can-your-dna-tell-the-police-what-you-look-like/ READ MORE Is Your DNA Safe? A private company has been fired by the cops for helping identify a suspect in the Faith Hedgepeth case. But is law enforcement’s use of public DNA databases ethical? This is the N&O special report. Scientists believe that DNA serves as a template for visible features of a person’s […]]]>

READ MORE


Is Your DNA Safe?

A private company has been fired by the cops for helping identify a suspect in the Faith Hedgepeth case. But is law enforcement’s use of public DNA databases ethical? This is the N&O special report.


Scientists believe that DNA serves as a template for visible features of a person’s body. And by studying the DNA of known people, they can predict the characteristics of an unknown person using their DNA.

This is exactly what Parabon NanoLabs employees do to help agents solve crimes.

The Chapel Hill Police Department turned to Parabon NanoLabs in 2016 after working for four years to try to find out who killed 19-year-old Faith Hedgepeth in a bedroom in her shared apartment near the UNC-Chapel Hill campus.

Ellen Greytak, director of bioinformatics and technical lead of Parabon NanoLabs’ Snapshot Advanced DNA Analysis division, said the company uses DNA from crime scenes to create a composite sketch of the killer.

“We look at DNA as a blueprint,” said Greytak.

His staff extracted the DNA found at The Hedgepeth crime scene.

Their analysis returned with the following description of possible suspicious physical characteristics.

▪ Dark hair.

▪ Olive-colored skin.

▪ Hazel eyes.

▪ Few, if any, freckles.

The analysis appeared on the spot when officers arrested Miguel Salguero-Olivares, 28, last month for first degree murder in Hedgepeth’s death.

But how did the scientists get there?

“There are always variables, but the way we make our prediction is probabilistic prediction,” said Greytak.

Test known characteristics

Greytak said Parabon NanoLabs is looking for five eye colors: hazelnut, brown, blue, green and black.

She said the lab compares DNA from 1,000 people with these characteristics to DNA from an unknown suspect.

This gives them the probability of the suspect’s eye color based on their known samples.

They do the same for skin tones, hair color, face shape, and the presence of freckles.

When giving their prediction to the police, they include a percentage confidence interval for each characteristic.

“We can never be 100% sure because we haven’t seen everyone,” said Greytak.

Composite sketch

The laboratory provides the probable characteristics to an artist, who creates a composite sketch of the suspect.

Greytak added that facial features include whether the suspect may have a wide jaw, high nose, or narrow eyes. But she said things like earlobe attachment or the dominant hand are more complex and harder to predict.

She also said that the DNA a person is born with is the same as when they die. Age, weight and hairstyles cannot be determined by phenotyping.

Often when the artist creates a composite for the police, the drawing is made as if the suspect is 25 years old.

“They’ll always have the same face, eye color, and skin color, so it’s all written in your DNA,” said Greytak. “It’s just a matter of finding.

She said she stressed to the police that the drawing and the predictions are just that and should not be used without further proof.

Greytak said that of the 181 cases Parabon NanoLabs is believed to have helped resolve, just over a dozen were resolved using phenotyping alone.

“It’s definitely a much smaller number,” said Greytak.

Other cases have been resolved through genetic genealogy, which matches DNA from a crime scene with DNA uploaded to a public database. From there, a genealogist traces the suspect’s family tree until she can find out who owns the DNA.

“Phenotyping is right – it’s much less specific than genetic genealogy, but what we’ve found is that it’s really useful to use it with genetic genealogy,” Greytak said.

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DNA key to revisit 2 cold killings of Kilgore https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/dna-key-to-revisit-2-cold-killings-of-kilgore/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 04:22:00 +0000 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/dna-key-to-revisit-2-cold-killings-of-kilgore/ TYLER, Texas (KLTV) – An east Texas police department is reviewing a few unresolved cases in hopes of identifying the victims and ultimately resolving the cases. Kilgore Police are examining two cases, decades apart, in hopes DNA will provide answers. A DNA tech company could help solve them. “Where we come in is when you […]]]>

TYLER, Texas (KLTV) – An east Texas police department is reviewing a few unresolved cases in hopes of identifying the victims and ultimately resolving the cases.

Kilgore Police are examining two cases, decades apart, in hopes DNA will provide answers.

A DNA tech company could help solve them.

“Where we come in is when you don’t get results on the database, or when you don’t get results on a suspect. These cases that are 30-40-50 years old, it’s now that investigators are going back to this evidence to see if there is DNA, ”says Ellen Graytak Ph.d, of Parabon Nanolabs Technologies in Virginia.

In December 2000, investigators found the body of a woman in a wooded area near Spinks-Chapman Road in Gregg County. To date, she has not been identified and no clues have been found as to the cause of her death.

“What’s the first question investigators are going to ask? “Who knew the victim? “But if you got even bones, there’s enough DNA in there to still understand who that person is,” says Graytak.

The Parabon scan revealed important things to the police. The woman was of Native American ancestry, there was a 75% chance that she was from Central America and had black hair, brown or dark eyes, and light brown skin.

“There has been a lot of progress in DNA analysis over the past few years. Genetic genealogy links DNA to identity by building family trees. They can attribute this to a group of cousins, siblings, or to a single person, ”explains the doctor.

The second case is the 1988 murder of a 65-year-old man who was found dead from a gunshot wound to the head in his home on Highway 31 West.

Investigators recovered a DNA sample from the house in hopes that it would lead to a suspect.

“The challenge is to determine ‘who owns the DNA’? Said Graytak.

The DNA genealogical link was used in 2018 to identify and arrest the man known as the Golden State Killer, a serial killer in the 1970s and 1980s in California.

Copyright 2021 KLTV. All rights reserved.

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Margaret Orelene Higgs | News, Sports, Jobs https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/margaret-orelene-higgs-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 00:09:28 +0000 https://kilmingtonprimary.co.uk/margaret-orelene-higgs-news-sports-jobs/ Erica Rodriguez July 17, 1936 – October 4, 2021 After an incredible 85-year journey, our beautiful wife, mom, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend left this earth, bound for heaven, on October 4, 2021. Margaret Orelene Higgs was born on July 17, 1936 in Salt Lake City, Utah, the first child of Amasa Hamblin and Margaret […]]]>

Erica Rodriguez

July 17, 1936 – October 4, 2021

After an incredible 85-year journey, our beautiful wife, mom, grandmother, sister, aunt and friend left this earth, bound for heaven, on October 4, 2021.

Margaret Orelene Higgs was born on July 17, 1936 in Salt Lake City, Utah, the first child of Amasa Hamblin and Margaret Ramage.

She graduated from Weber High School. It was the summer before her final year that she met our father and his lifelong love Donald E. Higgs. They were married the following spring, on March 17, 1954, in the Salt Lake City Temple.

Together, they welcomed, loved, cherished and adored their 10 children, four boys and six girls. Mum’s main desire was and is to be a good mum and in this she excelled. She loves her children with all that she is and is their biggest fan. Their impossible becomes possible seen through his eyes. Her love is unwavering and she considers her children, grandchildren, great grandchildren and great great grandchildren as her GREATEST accomplishments.

Mom wanted everyone around her to know that she loved them unconditionally, praising, teaching and encouraging, when the situation called for it. If there was someone in need, Mom wouldn’t hesitate to donate when, where, and what she could.

Mom has been an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints her entire life in service in various callings. She shared much of her time, talents and love in the service of those around her. Her faith and her prayers taught all who loved her to seek the greatest good in everyone and in everything.

She has a knack for crochet and her homemade afghans and heating pads were her favorite gifts to those she loved. Her gentle hands combined with countless hours and endless love turned a single piece of thread into her many works of art. Mom also enjoyed camping, crosswords, word searches, reading, and genealogy. When it came to remembering family lines and names of people, his memory was foolproof.

Orelene is survived by her loving husband, Donald E .; and children, Donald A. Higgs (Julieanne), Kevin Higgs (Annette), Julie Talbot (Steve), Wayne Higgs (Michele), Susan Behr (Chris), Becky Birchum (Art), Maria Rigby (Brent) and many little ones -children, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren.

While the reunion in Heaven is undoubtedly glorious with the ones that came before, we’re sure mom’s eyes are twinkling and she’s happy to be playing cars with her son, Curtis Higgs, lighting fireworks with her. her daughter, Carolyn Killpack, to crochet with her daughter, June Cannon, laughing and making a potato salad for all the extended family that welcomes her.

Those of us who remain will take the watch and honor it by living and sharing its Love. How blessed we are to have been touched by this beautiful soul and how grateful we are to know that we will be together again. We love you mom!

All services will take place at Leavitt’s Mortuary located at 836 36th St, Ogden Utah.

The viewing will take place on Friday, October 15 from 9.45 a.m. to 10.45 a.m. The funeral will follow Friday at 11:00 a.m.

Interment will be in the family plots located at the Mausoleum of Aultorest Memorial Park in Leavitt.

Condolences can be shared at www.leavittsmortuary.com.

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